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Seattle Neighborhood Farmers Market


See which vendors are scheduled to be at market this week: Saturdays at University District Farmers Market 9AM-2PM Sundays at West Seattle Farmers Market 10AM-2PM Sundays at Capitol Hill Farmers Market 11AM-3PM


With March officially upon us, we are starting to see the first signs of spring!


Vegetables:acorn squash, beans, beets, butternut squash, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, chard, collard greens, delicata squash, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, leeks, microgreens, mushrooms, onions, potatoes, salad greens, turnips, winter squash


Fruits: apples, pears


Flowers:tulips


Meat/seafood/protein: beef, chicken, oysters, pork, lamb, salami, salmon, tuna


All-season: bread, butter, cheese, cookies, dried beans, eggs, ferments, hazelnuts, honey, hot sauce, hummus, jams, oils, pickles, pasta, sauces, vinegar


Ready to eat:chowder, dumplings, pastries, sandwiches, tamales, tacos


Drinks: beer, cider, hard cider, kombucha, mead, wine


Hey farmers market shoppers! The LAST day that you can spend your green 2022 Farm Bucks is March 31, 2023. The grace period ends at the end of March, and after that, you will have to use the pink 2023 Farm Bucks, so consider this an excuse to splurge!


Our friends at The Daily UW have recently started a new column that our shoppers will enjoy. The segment, 'Farm to Desk,' features profiles of vendors at the University District Farmers Market on a biweekly basis. Here's an excerpt from a profile of Loki Fish Company:

In 1979, Pete Knutson and Hing Lau Ng bought a 1959 wooden gillnetter built on the Fraser River in New Westminster, Canada. They would later name the boat Loki, after the Norse god of mischief.

“Loki is pretty central in terms of surviving,” Knutson, the founder of Loki Fish Company, said. “He always survived between man and god. And Loki was the inventor of the fishing net, and he would also shapeshift. When the gods would try to punish him, he would turn into a salmon and escape.”

The legacy of the Loki name undoubtedly applies to Knutson’s life. The fisherman has been in the fishing industry for 51 years, and since then, he has managed to survive both boat burnings and sinkings

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